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Quad players, back pain tips?
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Poster Quad players, back pain tips?
DiruIkasu





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Joined: Dec 28, 2008
No. 1 Posted on Aug 18, 2009 6:30 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
So, I finally got a "promotion" from Tri's to Quads. The Tri's were a Yamaha powerlite series, so they were like, the lightest instrument in the line. Our school just bought a new set of quads (They're Pearl Championship series, I believe), and I've been playing them now for about a week now. BUT, my back is absolutely killing me! These things are really heavy! So, is there anything I can do about the back pain, or will I just have to bear with it and get used to it? Also, are there any exercises I can do to make my quad experience a little better?


"He who cannot dance will say: "The drum is bad”
Texray1





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No. 2 Posted on Aug 21, 2009 8:57 AM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Push-ups will help to a degree. They work the psoas muscles, which are the largest muscles in the back. I'm afraid back pain is part of the territory on a drumline unless you are pretty athletic. I was a skinny scarecrow in high school so I was always hurting to some degree. The adrenalin just overwhelmed the pain most days.



lilblakdak





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No. 3 Posted on Aug 23, 2009 2:32 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Get a backbrace.
Trust me you dont want to mess with your back.



Pain heals. Chicks dig scars. Glory... lasts forever.
Crusher



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No. 4 Posted on Aug 24, 2009 6:57 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Stretch and make sure you warm those back muscles up as well as you do your wrists. I would also try to strengthen your back by doing some weight training BUT go fro reps NOT weight. In other words small weight more reps. Try also to do sit ups and other core exercises because this all helps your back.



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pataflafla





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No. 5 Posted on Aug 25, 2009 7:35 AM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Not that my response will answer your problem, but I'm continually mystified by two drum weight related issues here:

1. Why the drum companies ('Dynasty' being the exception with their Wedge snares and Squint tenors) don't develop lighter weight/design drum shells.

2. Why SO many high school band directors and/or their drum instructors specify the necessarily heavier quads, quints or --God knows why-- "six packs" for their tenor players, when they should use triples.

HS bands are *NOT* and never will be D&B corps! They don't do [or, arguably, need] the complex shows like corps; don't have the time to develop such shows; and --particularly-- can't reliably expect to have the more developed, larger-bodied people to *carry* the heavier, larger quads, etc. that corps must use.

STAY WITH TRIPLES for HS kids! Why, why, why put them through the pain of carrying the heavier drums? THERE'S NO REASON; NO JUSTIFICATION!! The argument that "Other HS bands uses them" doesn't matter!

GRRRRRRRRRR....

--Me
who, in part, wrote for & taught [including two state champion lines] and then judged HS drum lines in Illinois and Washington for 12 years... and who, now, increasingly winces at seeing HS kids suffer under heavy drums.


pataflafla edited on Aug 25, 2009 7:47 AM

General percussion since 1957.
D&B corps since 1965.
Drum set (correctly!) since 1970.

http://jimnevermannart.carbonmade.com

...and that is *not* 2nd Wind's uniform I'm wearing!
SPuDS

manbearpig



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No. 6 Posted on Aug 29, 2009 10:49 AM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Stretching and sit ups.

Stronger abs will help your lower back. You will eventually get used to it even if you don't do anything but carry them, but stretching and sit ups will help out a lot.

I carried tenors for 5 years, the first 4 months I was feeling the same thing.



My name is Lucas.

DiruIkasu





Posts: 21
Joined: Dec 28, 2008
No. 7 Posted on Sep 5, 2009 2:27 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
pataflafla wrote:
Not that my response will answer your problem, but I'm continually mystified by two drum weight related issues here:

1. Why the drum companies ('Dynasty' being the exception with their Wedge snares and Squint tenors) don't develop lighter weight/design drum shells.

2. Why SO many high school band directors and/or their drum instructors specify the necessarily heavier quads, quints or --God knows why-- "six packs" for their tenor players, when they should use triples.

HS bands are *NOT* and never will be D&B corps! They don't do [or, arguably, need] the complex shows like corps; don't have the time to develop such shows; and --particularly-- can't reliably expect to have the more developed, larger-bodied people to *carry* the heavier, larger quads, etc. that corps must use.

STAY WITH TRIPLES for HS kids! Why, why, why put them through the pain of carrying the heavier drums? THERE'S NO REASON; NO JUSTIFICATION!! The argument that "Other HS bands uses them" doesn't matter!

GRRRRRRRRRR....

--Me
who, in part, wrote for & taught [including two state champion lines] and then judged HS drum lines in Illinois and Washington for 12 years... and who, now, increasingly winces at seeing HS kids suffer under heavy drums.


Very true. But, we cant use tri's anymore for one very good reason: Modern marching band music requires quads, and sometimes quints.

Let alone, it's easy to march with four drums than 3 because we rarely play in 6/8 anymore. There's only one song we play in 6/8, and it's a John Phillip Sousa song.

It's not really possible to really play with three drums with the new modern music.



"He who cannot dance will say: "The drum is bad”
Tanimal

TAN-I-MAL!



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No. 8 Posted on Sep 5, 2009 5:13 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
DiruIkasu wrote:
Very true. But, we cant use tri's anymore for one very good reason: Modern marching band music requires quads, and sometimes quints.

Let alone, it's easy to march with four drums than 3 because we rarely play in 6/8 anymore. There's only one song we play in 6/8, and it's a John Phillip Sousa song.

It's not really possible to really play with three drums with the new modern music.

Agreed, and I don't think any highschool kids are complaining about the weight from quads as much as they enjoy playing them. quints and 6 packs are over the edge though, no music requires that madness. And I disagree with the point that highschools don't do drum feature things. Every year my school has about a 5 minute feature for football halftime show and it gets the biggest applause every time. But I get the feeling that my school works a bit different than others, the director couldn't care less about what we do as long as it looks and sounds cool, we don't do the choreography the rest of the band does at all, we just make up what we want to do on the field.



drums>life
drumbum593

The Bum



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No. 9 Posted on Sep 5, 2009 5:56 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Actually, a lot more high school lines are doing drum breaks and playing parts that are on an almost-corps level. Of course, it's never going to be on that level of difficulty, but they still call for at least quads, and usually quints. Tris are almost obsolete in modern marching band, quads and quints are becoming the norm. Quints and six-packs may seem like overkill, but the spock drums add variety and the effect is really cool. I play tenors on a high school line, and I don't know what we'd do without quints, as much as we use the spock. Also, the weight isn't really that bad. But if it is, the best way to get your back stronger is to do push-ups and other exercises to strengthen back muscles, and just wear the drums. Once you get used to it, it's not bad. When I moved from snare to tenors, it bothered me for about a week, but after that, I was fine.


Bartlett HS
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Munford HS
Tenors 08-09 USSBA South States Percussion Champ
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Tanimal

TAN-I-MAL!



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No. 10 Posted on Sep 5, 2009 7:19 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Although I do have to say that drums have screwed up my shoulders. When I roll my shoulders I can hear tendons and muscles and junk kind of rolling over my shoulder blades, which I'm pretty sure isn't normal. And my arms occasionally get that pins and needles feeling because a nerve gets pinched in my shoulder. No pain or problems moving though!!!


drums>life
Boojum

that



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No. 11 Posted on Sep 7, 2009 12:20 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
The majority of the strength in your back comes from your abdominal muscles. Aside from crunches, side crunches, supermans, pushups, planks, side planks, leg lifts, assisted leg lifts, and things like that, there's not much you can do besides hold the drums. And with all of those exercises, make sure you do them correctly, otherwise they don't do any good.

As for the pain itself? Ibuprofen seems to work well...



I wanted a Monty Python quote but it was too many chars...
'We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, therefore, is not an act, but a habit.'
-Aristotle.
'Spell it right. Or else.'
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DiruIkasu





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Joined: Dec 28, 2008
No. 12 Posted on Sep 9, 2009 4:20 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
It's only about 3 weeks in, and I have a lot to get used to. But, when we were practicing parade, we did about 3 laps around my school's track (About a mile and half), and I swear, I felt like I was gonna collapse (this was after about 2 hours of practicing shows), I could barely finish that third lap.

Is that normal?



"He who cannot dance will say: "The drum is bad”
HuskerFan

Joshua



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Location: Omaha, Nebraska
No. 13 Posted on Sep 9, 2009 9:37 PM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
If you feel like you're going to pass out, that's bad. If you have to, tell the director that you haven't felt well. If he's good, he won't make you keep going till you're knocked out. Drink a lot of water. Breathe. If you have one of those belts to keep a drill chart/supplies in, try to fit the water bottle in there. That's what I've done (playing snare) and it's worked well. Especially in 100 degree heat.


Gretsch Catalina Club Jazz in Copper Sparkle

pataflafla





Posts: 252
Joined: Mar 8, 2005
No. 14 Posted on Sep 10, 2009 7:59 AM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
DiruIkasu wrote:
Let alone, it's easy to march with four drums than 3 because we rarely play in 6/8 anymore. There's only one song we play in 6/8, and it's a John Phillip Sousa song.

It's not really possible to really play with three drums with the new modern music.


"Not possible"? Hardly!

There's no relation whatsoever between the number of drums per person and the genre or meter of the music they're playing or could play. Snares have only one head, but has that ever restricted their repertoire?

Obviously "six pack" tenors will give a drum arranger/composer more tonal range and sticking patterns to write for than single shell tenors will, but that's all.


pataflafla edited on Sep 14, 2009 1:01 PM

General percussion since 1957.
D&B corps since 1965.
Drum set (correctly!) since 1970.

http://jimnevermannart.carbonmade.com

...and that is *not* 2nd Wind's uniform I'm wearing!
Boojum

that



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Location: the rock of Gibraltar
No. 15 Posted on Sep 13, 2009 6:58 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Is your school's track a standard track around a football field? Or do you guys have some other distance track?


I wanted a Monty Python quote but it was too many chars...
'We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, therefore, is not an act, but a habit.'
-Aristotle.
'Spell it right. Or else.'
-El Booj
DiruIkasu





Posts: 21
Joined: Dec 28, 2008
No. 16 Posted on Sep 27, 2009 8:38 AM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
pataflafla wrote:
"Not possible"? Hardly!

There's no relation whatsoever between the number of drums per person and the genre or meter of the music they're playing or could play. Snares have only one head, but has that ever restricted their repertoire?

Obviously "six pack" tenors will give a drum arranger/composer more tonal range and sticking patterns to write for than single shell tenors will, but that's all.


I mean it's not impossible. I use to play tri's. But it's just soooooooo much easier for me, especially since the sticking becomes easier.



"He who cannot dance will say: "The drum is bad”
DiruIkasu





Posts: 21
Joined: Dec 28, 2008
No. 17 Posted on Sep 27, 2009 8:40 AM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Boojum wrote:
Is your school's track a standard track around a football field? Or do you guys have some other distance track?


Yeah, it's the standard track around the football field. It's not as bad as it used to be anymore when I do parade, because I think my back is starting to get used to it.



"He who cannot dance will say: "The drum is bad”
fftl1717





Posts: 1
Joined: Nov 21, 2009
No. 18 Posted on Nov 21, 2009 1:20 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
I'm in a high school line, we just finished up our season, and are preparing for an indoor line and next year's marching season. The best tips are to stretch your back out, wear the tenors as long as you possibly can, push it a little more, then take a break. Don't stretch out your back too often though, because then you won't build up endurance.

As for the people who say that sixpacks are too much to handle, i will have to disagree. We have sixpacks at my school, and as long as you are committed to drumline as much as my line is, the weight is no problem. A couple of years ago we actually had a girl about 4' 9" march our sixpacks...



sadrummer777





Posts: 1
Joined: Mar 24, 2010
No. 19 Posted on Mar 24, 2010 7:46 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
pataflafla wrote:
Not that my response will answer your problem, but I'm continually mystified by two drum weight related issues here:

1. Why the drum companies ('Dynasty' being the exception with their Wedge snares and Squint tenors) don't develop lighter weight/design drum shells.

2. Why SO many high school band directors and/or their drum instructors specify the necessarily heavier quads, quints or --God knows why-- "six packs" for their tenor players, when they should use triples.

HS bands are *NOT* and never will be D&B corps! They don't do [or, arguably, need] the complex shows like corps; don't have the time to develop such shows; and --particularly-- can't reliably expect to have the more developed, larger-bodied people to *carry* the heavier, larger quads, etc. that corps must use.

STAY WITH TRIPLES for HS kids! Why, why, why put them through the pain of carrying the heavier drums? THERE'S NO REASON; NO JUSTIFICATION!! The argument that "Other HS bands uses them" doesn't matter!

GRRRRRRRRRR....

--Me
who, in part, wrote for & taught [including two state champion lines] and then judged HS drum lines in Illinois and Washington for 12 years... and who, now, increasingly winces at seeing HS kids suffer under heavy drums.


Ok so dude
you are underestimating some high schoolers
you are making it sound like we are not good enough to play complicated stuff on the quads, quints, or even six packs
i am a freshman and i made it onto the quints of a first place winning line
i did totally fine and our shows are extremely complicated compared to all of the other teams
High Schoolers can deal with them



ChelseaHeming





Posts: 2
Joined: Oct 2, 2010
No. 20 Posted on Oct 2, 2010 6:15 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
i have the same problem,however i play the marching xylophone which i would guess is at least 60 pounds...Minimum and im 14yr old girl the xylophone is only supported by my waist not by my shoulders i cant march with that thing for more that like 15 minutes because my back hurts soooo much since iv only been playing for a few months can you guys give mme and tips?


Nevermann





Posts: 5
Joined: Jul 31, 2006
Location: Whidbey Island WA
No. 21 Posted on Dec 4, 2010 5:31 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
sadrummer777 wrote:
you are making it sound like we are not good enough to play complicated stuff on the quads, quints, or even six packs
i am a freshman and i made it onto the quints

Don't misunderstand me: *some* HS lines do have the players to handle "complicated stuff". I argue that the majority don't, particularly those lines who have no instructor, or change their show for every halftime [LOTS of those] and have only a vague idea of corps drumming standards. I, for example, had never even heard of corps when I got into HS band nor, except for one person, had any of the rest of the band.

My big complaint is the heavier weight of *conventional design* high-tension snares and especially tenors. You say you're a freshman, but what height & weight freshman? Too, you have the real luxury of being in a winning HS drum line [read: a "corps style" line] that plays complicated parts, which also means your line very likely has at least one drum instructor.

But ZILLIONS of HS lines don't have those luxuries and, I thus argue, why buy --and have their students lug around-- top-caliber drums simply because they're available; because they're in the catalogs or "They're what everyone's using"? That, to me, very clearly doesn't make financial, educational or physical [as in carrying heavier, higher performance drums] sense. The students sure don't benefit.



GOTQUADS





Posts: 1
Joined: Sep 10, 2012
No. 22 Posted on Sep 10, 2012 10:22 AM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
I just got Dynasty Custom Elite "6-pack" (6"-8"-10"-12"-13"-14") and I'm only in HS. I love them so much, however, the back pain is sometimes overwhelming. we started the season off with 2 tenor players, but my tenor-buddy has been moved to the pit after the tenors gave him 3 herniated disks in his spine. However, I still agree with our decision to purchase the new line. I would like to thank you all for the tips on how to reduce the pain. I have already purchased a back brace and plan to work out often. My only goal for this season is to be able to go to Grand Nats pain free and to have a successful season (of course). So again, thanks for the tips and whatnot.



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