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Drum Teacher.
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karlhungus





Posts: 26
Joined: Dec 10, 2005
Location: So. Cal
No. 1 Posted on Jan 13, 2006 1:26 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Does everyone need a drum teacher to learn how to play drums & read music? If you can't afford a teacher what do you do? Can you teach youself to play & read music? Does every drummer have a teacher? I'm just starting out & i'm getting frustrated, Because I don't know if I'm doing things correctly. I don't know if I'm using My metronome correctly, If I'm going to fast or to slow. I wonder if all big time drummers had a teacher? Any help & advice welcome. Thank You.


RemoAmbass





Posts: 27
Joined: Jan 18, 2006
No. 2 Posted on Jan 18, 2006 5:03 AM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Luckily today there are tons of videos online to help you! Do searches and you might find help!


ChaosDrummer





Posts: 184
Joined: Jun 22, 2005
No. 3 Posted on Jan 18, 2006 4:17 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
I've had a teacher for drums, but not guitar. I picked up guitar fairly fast with no teachers and books, but drums usually take special technique and if you do start doing something wrong it can be hard to break


pwc





Posts: 9911
Joined: Jan 16, 2005
Location: Pattaya, Thailand
No. 4 Posted on Feb 16, 2006 9:59 PM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
In theory, you can learn to read etc without a teacher but nothing will be a better investment than going to one. In the meantime, try the Vic Firth web site for some good rudiment stuff. Look at drummer world under "grooves" at some nice videos.
Also try tigerbills web site. There are quite a few sites that give you some basic guidelines. Good luck



Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.
syncopation





Posts: 305
Joined: Jan 15, 2005
Location: Rainier, OR if I am not on the road
No. 5 Posted on Mar 11, 2006 5:24 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
from:Tappingdancer
REMO


TO: KARLHUNGUS

REMO FORUM



Dear Sir:

I am going to email you some good reading on this. I think you will like it.
I telling you this here so you don't delete me when you get mail from me.
Sincerely,
SyncBlush
I will try to pm it first.


syncopation edited on Mar 11, 2006 5:33 PM

jlane



Super Moderator

Posts: 2
Joined: May 24, 2006
No. 6 Posted on May 26, 2006 10:23 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
It is best that you find a teacher. Where do you live? There are videos out there, but a teacher cannot be replaced. Your best shot is with a good teacher. Go to music stores or check with a university in your area.


T_Lee





Posts: 31
Joined: May 23, 2006
Location: West Jordan, Utah
No. 7 Posted on May 27, 2006 9:38 AM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Ya it is alot easier and you get the info you need first hand if you have a good teacher. It is also very fun. But if you can't afford the lessons or if there is nowhere to take lessons then get online and just check out online videos.


surdo





Posts: 52
Joined: Nov 28, 2006
No. 8 Posted on Nov 29, 2006 10:19 AM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
karlhungus wrote:
Does everyone need a drum teacher to learn how to play drums & read music? If you can't afford a teacher what do you do? Can you teach youself to play & read music? Does every drummer have a teacher? I'm just starting out & i'm getting frustrated, Because I don't know if I'm doing things correctly. I don't know if I'm using My metronome correctly, If I'm going to fast or to slow. I wonder if all big time drummers had a teacher? Any help & advice welcome. Thank You.


Hello.

One can learn to read without a teacher. I recomend a teacher though if it is possible for you. Teachers can help in many areas. They can not only teach drums but also offer career advice, recomendations to other instrumentalists looking for drummers, and they have a bird's eye view of your playing and technique and can help you correct or improve it where necessary.

A good start for you now is to have a look at the Vic Firth site and learn the rudiments.
http://www.vicfirth.com/education/rudiments.html

Working with a metronome is essential. Drummers need good meter and must develop a solid groove. A good way to start is to set the tempo very slow, say 40 to 50 bpm. Then just play 1/4 notes to it. From there you expand upon it as you progress. Please remember to begin slow. Before you can play anything fast with accuracy, you must develop slow playing. This is so you become familiar with the space between the notes. Practice the same techniques with your feet.

As for learning to read in detail? Check out Modern Reading Text in 4/4: For All Instruments by Louis Bellson and Gil Breines. I believe this is the text Dennis Chambers used to learn to read. I recall an old MD interview with Bellson where he said we was touring in Italy and went to a restaurant. While there he heard someone practicing up the back on a pad. He went to investigate and it was Dennis working from his book. Big Smile

You can also use DVDs to learn. For hand technique I recomend Jim Chapin's DVD. He demonstrates the Moeller technique in detail.

Plus as someone mentioned, check out the online lessons found on sites such as youtube.

Good luck.



ktzj





Posts: 443
Joined: Sep 22, 2007
Location: Kuala Lumpur Malaysia
No. 9 Posted on Sep 25, 2007 5:53 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
You can learn reading and everything else on your own, but to get the best effect a teacher is needed to tell you where you are going wrong, as opposed to stumbling on your mistakes years down the road.


BruceJ



Super Moderator

Posts: 14
Joined: Apr 14, 2005
No. 10 Posted on Nov 8, 2007 4:37 PM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Most everyone who has ever had a teacher will tell you that it helped them.

Teachers will help you learn more quickly, and they will also help to prevent from developing bad habits.

Find a teacher in your area (ask other drummers, your local music store, high school or college). Don't worry too much about cost...you can always work out a deal such as lessons every other week, or half hour instead of an hour if money is tight.

Remember the saying: "If you think education is expensive, try ignorance".

Good luck!



Bruce Jacoby
Manager of Education
Remo,Inc.
delmar

 FEMUR



Posts: 1150
Joined: Jan 15, 2005
Location: Rome, Georgia
No. 11 Posted on Dec 14, 2007 6:10 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
be sure to break the rythm down and then speed it up. and play lots of polly rythms


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ModernDrummer





Posts: 3233
Joined: Jan 15, 2005
Location: Chicagoland, U.S.A.
No. 12 Posted on Jan 24, 2008 1:42 PM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
I took music lessons for right at 12 years, and I fully endorse the idea of going to a GOOD teacher if it's at all possible.

Yes, you CAN learn without a teacher, but I'll tell ya, it's an invaluable resource. Your progress will be MUCH faster, you'll learn proper technique, "eliminating" bad habits before they start, and on and on.

There's teachers, then there's "Teachers", if ya know what I mean. The challenge is to find a good one. Look for a cat that has PLENTY of experience himself, and who's worked on improving himself. If he's in a working band, go check him out in the band setting. Watch what he DOES, not just what he talks. If you meet him at his teaching studio, don't be afraid to ask for a demonstration. He / she can't teach ya how to properly play, say a pataflafla, if he doesn't even know what a pataflafla IS!

Can't teach ya a hand/foot triplet or quadruplet if they can't play it, no matter what anyone tells ya to the contrary. So, if they can't PLAY, IMO you're just throwin' your money away on lessons from that person. In that case, it's better to spend it on videos.

Lessons from a worthwhile teacher will challenge you and push you ahead further and faster than ANY other method, without exception. Just make sure when you CHOOSE an instructor, you're a harsh critic BEFORE you make your selection. If you're not "impressed" with the person, move on and look for someone who does impress you.




07 May, 2001

Eeasyflow





Posts: 8
Joined: Aug 19, 2008
No. 13 Posted on Aug 19, 2008 12:12 PM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Hi!

As someone mention earlier in the forum much information is available on-line:

Here are a couple of additional links that can get you started:

http://www.virtualdrummerschool.com
http://www.vicfirth.com/education/EPoverview.html
http://www.learningdrum.com
http://www.youtube.com/ (search for drumlessons, drumtechniques)

My suggestion is to start with basic techniques for feets, hands and coordination.

Good luck!




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