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paul

paulmiller



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Location: Lewisville, Texas, USA
No. 1 Posted on Mar 26, 2014 3:02 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Our big band played a show last night, and several of us, including John, the leader, went out for dinner afterwards.

At dinner, John was discussing a band he'd recently heard, and criticized the drummer for the sound of his cymbals (too thick and clangy) and drums (sound like marching drums). He then said, "I never paid attention to the sound of drums until this guy (pointing at me) joined the band."

Me being anal about tuning drums and choosing cymbals, and often discussing it with him has gotten him listening to drums and drummers in a whole new way.

I feel so proud.



The presence of those seeking the truth is infinitely preferable to the presence of those who think they've found it. - Terry Pratchett

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Singlestroker





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No. 2 Posted on Mar 26, 2014 5:02 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
paul wrote:...Me being anal about tuning drums and choosing cymbals, and often discussing it with him has gotten him listening to drums and drummers in a whole new way.

I feel so proud.


.. and rightly so!



technique2012





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Joined: Aug 11, 2012
Location: Illinois, USA
No. 3 Posted on Mar 26, 2014 6:10 PM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Awesome! It's always a great feeling knowing how influential we can be, even though we are usually the guys sitting in the back.


"Anyone can make the simple complicated. Creativity is making the complicated simple."
-Charles Mingus
OldFart

Mapex



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Location: Peoria, AZ
No. 4 Posted on Mar 26, 2014 8:12 PM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
paul wrote:

[ ... Snip ... ]

... John was discussing a band he'd recently heard, and criticized the drummer for the sound of his cymbals (too thick and clangy) and drums (sound like marching drums). He then said, "I never paid attention to the sound of drums until this guy (pointing at me) joined the band."


And he's been round the block a few times in his career ...

Me being anal about tuning drums and choosing cymbals, and often discussing it with him has gotten him listening to drums and drummers in a whole new way.

I feel so proud.


That's quite a positive statement John made; proof that the subtleties weren't missed. Food for the soul Cool



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Terry Bozzio Single-Ply Coated
StillKicken





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Joined: Jan 16, 2005
Location: Buda, Texas
No. 5 Posted on Mar 29, 2014 3:30 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
That is really cool Paul, I'm glad that someone was able to learn something about our musical instruments.

Sometimes while tuning someone (including musicians) will ask what I'm doing and I reply that I'm tuning drums, then they laugh like I was telling a joke. Depending on who it is I just feel insulted then smile and let it go, to others I will explain and they will be amazed and reply that they didn't know drums were tunable.

Paul, keep up the good work of informing the world!

sherm



K.I.S.S. = Keep It Simple System
StillKicken





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Location: Buda, Texas
No. 6 Posted on Mar 29, 2014 3:54 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
http://www.drumarchive.com/Ludwig/1939a_WFL.pdf

OH, BTW: I just came up with a new reply. When people laugh I should say; yes, drummers have been tuning drums since at least the late '30s. LOL!!!

I have this exact paper version catalog as noted in the web site above. They show real Tunable Toms on one of the pages. I looked at the 1920's catalogs and they have tunable snare drums as well.

sherm Big Smile


StillKicken edited on Mar 29, 2014 3:58 PM

K.I.S.S. = Keep It Simple System
paul

paulmiller



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Joined: Jan 23, 2005
Location: Lewisville, Texas, USA
No. 7 Posted on Mar 30, 2014 4:57 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
I recently read that some early big band drummers used tympani heads on their bass drums, and tuned to the lowest note on the string bass.


The presence of those seeking the truth is infinitely preferable to the presence of those who think they've found it. - Terry Pratchett

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technique2012





Posts: 283
Joined: Aug 11, 2012
Location: Illinois, USA
No. 8 Posted on Mar 30, 2014 5:42 PM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
paul wrote:
I recently read that some early big band drummers used tympani heads on their bass drums, and tuned to the lowest note on the string bass.

That'd be interesting to try. I like the idea of tuning to the lowest note on the bass.

On a different topic, I see some people spell it "timpani" and others "tympani". I say "timpani," but I don't really know which is correct and I've always been curious.



"Anyone can make the simple complicated. Creativity is making the complicated simple."
-Charles Mingus
Singlestroker





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No. 9 Posted on Mar 31, 2014 1:26 AM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
technique2012 wrote:...I see some people spell it "timpani" and others "tympani"...


When I was at grammar school here in the UK in the '60s, the music teacher wrote "tympani". The only place I have seen it written that way since (not that I move in orchestral circles) has been in Saul Goodman's famed book. Since he was an American, I have tended to assume that using the "y" spelling is American. Now I have looked in my recent edition of the Compact Oxford Dictionary, and found that it lists "timpani", but with "tympani" as an alternative spelling. Thus, over here at least, both spellings are correct.



pwc





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Location: Pattaya, Thailand
No. 10 Posted on Mar 31, 2014 3:41 AM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
The nature of a kit's sound was late in its importance rating for me. Then a couple of decades ago I really got into cymbals and their variety, found what I loved and then wanted the kit to match those in some musical way. It was probably at the time when I left what I called "noise with groove" bands and got into tasteful acoustic jazz trios. For that genre, a brash ride or poorly tuned tom is far more noticeable.


Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.
technique2012





Posts: 283
Joined: Aug 11, 2012
Location: Illinois, USA
No. 11 Posted on Mar 31, 2014 1:35 PM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
pwc wrote:
The nature of a kit's sound was late in its importance rating for me. Then a couple of decades ago I really got into cymbals and their variety, found what I loved and then wanted the kit to match those in some musical way. It was probably at the time when I left what I called "noise with groove" bands and got into tasteful acoustic jazz trios. For that genre, a brash ride or poorly tuned tom is far more noticeable.

I definitely agree with you on cymbals. I'm obsessed with putting together the perfect set of cymbals before a performance. However, for me as far as toms go, I really am never quite sure what tunings and adjustments fit the situation. I've never been sure and that's probably just due of my lack of experience.



"Anyone can make the simple complicated. Creativity is making the complicated simple."
-Charles Mingus
Singlestroker





Posts: 561
Joined: Apr 7, 2010
No. 12 Posted on Apr 1, 2014 12:28 AM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
pwc wrote:
The nature of a kit's sound was late in its importance rating for me...


It might be something that just doesn't happen without a fair bit of experience. I myself came back to drums in my late fifties after playing at school then leaving them behind for forty-odd years. Still, at about five years later, my understanding of what sounds good and where is still developing.



StillKickinIt

Poopeye



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Location: Orygun - The Beaver State - USA
No. 13 Posted on Apr 2, 2014 7:38 PM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
That's a helluva compliment Paul. Good for you!

Somewhat recently I was explaining how I prefer to tune my drums to someone (non musician) and they were surprised I could do that.



Kick me...beat me....hit me with sticks....
paul

paulmiller



Posts: 2684
Joined: Jan 23, 2005
Location: Lewisville, Texas, USA
No. 14 Posted on Apr 4, 2014 9:39 AM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
My parents gave me my first drum for my 12th birthday, and before I was allowed to play it, my dad, who'd played till he graduated from high school, insisted on showing me how to tune it. That lesson stuck with me more than anything else he ever said.


The presence of those seeking the truth is infinitely preferable to the presence of those who think they've found it. - Terry Pratchett

Just Add Sticks



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