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RvJim

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No. 1 Posted on Aug 27, 2013 10:55 PM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Some of you may know that I've been studying for a LONG time. I joined this forum about 9 years ago when I was an undergraduate. In that time, I've completed a Bachelor of Mathematics, a Graduate Certificate in IT, a Master of Applied Science (Physics) and today I finally got the letter that confers to me the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (Mechanical Engineering) for my thesis: In-Cylinder Pressure and Inter-Cycle Variability Analysis for a Compression Ignition Engine: Bayesian Approaches.

It has been a long road, the thesis took me just over 4 years to write (I finished writing it end of November last year). In Australia the examination process is very rigourous and takes a long time. It goes through internal review, which includes a public seminar, then it goes to external review (2 independent reviewers) then it comes back and has to be signed off by 4 academics. My thesis has been nominated for a university award (fingers crossed), I find out the outcome of that next year.

For those who've kept track of my career on here, thank you for your support. Looking forward to not having to study toward a degree again (until I retire and do a music degree!)

Dr. Tim Smile



"The right to be heard does not automatically include the right to be taken seriously"
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Singlestroker





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No. 2 Posted on Aug 28, 2013 2:38 AM Profile | PM | Email | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Congratulations, Dr Tim. I hope that your hard work is fully rewarded.


pwc





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No. 3 Posted on Aug 28, 2013 8:13 AM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
For your next thesis, write in shorthand and it will be quicker .... congrats, Tim, PhD.


Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.
Andy





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No. 4 Posted on Aug 28, 2013 3:06 PM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Dr. Tim,

Congratulations on your accomplishment. Your contributions to the forum as both a member and a moderator are second to none.

Now that you are a PhD, we will be expecting much more from you in the future! Smile

Andy




technique2012





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No. 5 Posted on Aug 28, 2013 3:48 PM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Dr. Tim,
I want to be a physicist when I'm older! Can you tell me about it?
And congrats!



"Anyone can make the simple complicated. Creativity is making the complicated simple."
-Charles Mingus
RvJim

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No. 6 Posted on Aug 28, 2013 7:26 PM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
technique2012 wrote:
Dr. Tim,
I want to be a physicist when I'm older! Can you tell me about it?
And congrats!


What do you want to know?

Moderate/poor pay (compared to other comparable professionals that work in industry)

The whole university training takes a LONG time and is heaps of work

Working as an academic has a lot of perks though: free overseas travel (for conferences paid for by the university), flexible work hours (i.e. no one knows when you are work or not, as long as you deliver no one cares), great for people with families (like me), and it has a nice social aspect to it.

There are not many physics jobs outside of academia though. There are some, in Australia we have (and you will have equiv.) Bureau of Meterology and the Bureau of Statistics, you can also work in a hospital (radiation jobs). But most people who do an undergraduate in physics go through and do a PhD and then work at a university. University jobs are fiercly competitive though and no easy to get.

Happy to provide more info if you want?



"The right to be heard does not automatically include the right to be taken seriously"
-Hubert H Humphrey
RvJim

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No. 7 Posted on Aug 28, 2013 7:27 PM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Andy wrote:
Dr. Tim,

Congratulations on your accomplishment. Your contributions to the forum as both a member and a moderator are second to none.

Now that you are a PhD, we will be expecting much more from you in the future! Smile

Andy


I'll try Smile



"The right to be heard does not automatically include the right to be taken seriously"
-Hubert H Humphrey
RvJim

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No. 8 Posted on Aug 28, 2013 7:28 PM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
pwc wrote:
For your next thesis, write in shorthand and it will be quicker .... congrats, Tim, PhD.


I knew I was doing something wrong, where were you 5 years ago!



"The right to be heard does not automatically include the right to be taken seriously"
-Hubert H Humphrey
RvJim

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No. 9 Posted on Aug 28, 2013 7:28 PM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Singlestroker wrote:
Congratulations, Dr Tim. I hope that your hard work is fully rewarded.


Me too, but I'm not holding my breath! I'll be happy if I just get a nice permanent job somewhere nice where my family is happy.



"The right to be heard does not automatically include the right to be taken seriously"
-Hubert H Humphrey
OldFart

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No. 10 Posted on Aug 31, 2013 3:34 PM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Dr. Tim -

Rudolf Diesel and Mr. Cummins would both be proud of you; as we are.

Congratulations!

I disagree ...

It's not the end of the road. It's the on-ramp to another.
My very best regards to you and your family Smile



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technique2012





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No. 11 Posted on Aug 31, 2013 6:09 PM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
RvJim wrote:
What do you want to know?

Moderate/poor pay (compared to other comparable professionals that work in industry)

The whole university training takes a LONG time and is heaps of work

Working as an academic has a lot of perks though: free overseas travel (for conferences paid for by the university), flexible work hours (i.e. no one knows when you are work or not, as long as you deliver no one cares), great for people with families (like me), and it has a nice social aspect to it.

There are not many physics jobs outside of academia though. There are some, in Australia we have (and you will have equiv.) Bureau of Meterology and the Bureau of Statistics, you can also work in a hospital (radiation jobs). But most people who do an undergraduate in physics go through and do a PhD and then work at a university. University jobs are fiercly competitive though and no easy to get.

Happy to provide more info if you want?

I really just wanted to see the job and salary scene. I guess maybe I should reconsider that psychology degree when I'm older. The physics degree doesn't sound as rewarding as I hoped it would be.



"Anyone can make the simple complicated. Creativity is making the complicated simple."
-Charles Mingus
Boettcher68

Tim



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No. 12 Posted on Sep 2, 2013 12:30 PM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
OldFart wrote:
Dr. Tim -

Rudolf Diesel and Mr. Cummins would both be proud of you; as we are.

Congratulations!

I disagree ...

It's not the end of the road. It's the on-ramp to another.
My very best regards to you and your family Smile



Well said!!

Congrats Dr. Tim!!




RvJim

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No. 13 Posted on Sep 2, 2013 4:18 PM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
technique2012 wrote:
I really just wanted to see the job and salary scene. I guess maybe I should reconsider that psychology degree when I'm older. The physics degree doesn't sound as rewarding as I hoped it would be.


Psychology isn't an easier road... it is a very popular degree and there are very few jobs. You'd be looking at a similar problem, to be competitive you'd likely need to do a higher degree (Master/PhD or both).

Physics is rewarding, I don't want to turn you away. Every potential career path has negatives. I think the negatives in academia are outweighed by the positives: flexible hours, relaxed working environment and lots of free travel. And whilst it is difficult to get a job, once you've gotten a proper academic position it is very difficult to get fired.



"The right to be heard does not automatically include the right to be taken seriously"
-Hubert H Humphrey
Andy





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No. 14 Posted on Sep 2, 2013 4:44 PM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
My advice (albeit unwanted): Don't expect to find a job that perfectly fits into your degree. Instead, find a job where your degree can compliment some employer's business. For example, if I had PhD in physics, (and I'm nowhere near smart enough for that) I'd be looking at engineering firms and manufacturing companies. No, it's not what you went to school for, but somewhere out there there's a company that needs "that guy" to troubleshoot and solve a technical problem that's been plaguing their operation for years, perplexing all the "smart guys". It's out there. You just have to find it. You might have to take a job as the assistant night manager of a plastic injection molding company. May not sound appealing but it's way to get yourself in the workforce even if it's not exactly what you wanted. Think of these sorts of jobs as stepping stones to greater opportunities in the future.



RvJim

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No. 15 Posted on Sep 2, 2013 4:48 PM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Andy wrote:
My advice (albeit unwanted): Don't expect to find a job that perfectly fits into your degree. Instead, find a job where your degree can compliment some employer's business. For example, if I had PhD in physics, (and I'm nowhere near smart enough for that) I'd be looking at engineering firms and manufacturing companies. No, it's not what you went to school for, but somewhere out there there's a company that needs "that guy" to troubleshoot and solve a technical problem that's been plaguing their operation for years, perplexing all the "smart guys". It's out there. You just have to find it. You might have to take a job as the assistant night manager of a plastic injection molding company. May not sound appealing but it's way to get yourself in the workforce even if it's not exactly what you wanted. Think of these sorts of jobs as stepping stones to greater opportunities in the future.


Andy is absolutely correct. I couldn't agree with you more, you'd be surprised too, just how much you learn by doing work slightly outside your comfort zone. And how happy people are when you can bring a fresh perspective to unsolved problems.



"The right to be heard does not automatically include the right to be taken seriously"
-Hubert H Humphrey
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Joshua



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No. 16 Posted on Sep 2, 2013 7:50 PM Profile | PM | Quote | Search | Copy | Favorite
Congratulations, Dr. Tim!


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